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of a foreign service officer. learning about foreign-policy around the dinner table each night to this service in combat -- his service in combat in vietnam. less well known is the story of this foreign policy work inside dissonant. -- the senate. his 90 overseas trips that he made in 28 years on foreign relations committee, his work to ensure free elections in the philippines, his work with aids in africa, his work as chairman of the new start treaty and his very public and successful diplomatic intervention in afghanistan, pakistan, and sudan. historians will judged his senate years on his impact on foreign policy much the same way so many people recognized ted kennedy's impact on domestic policy. from his many years in the u.s. senate, he has developed a very personal understanding that we represent not just states or governments, but also people. i once asked john why he loves the senate. he said it is the pride he feels in trying to get things done for people. for three years now, he has been working quietly to help a father from massachusetts, whose two sons were kidnapped and taken to
on this complex issue. robert kagn is a center fellow of the united states and european foreign policy of the brookings institution. his most recent book "the world america made" has been published and dr. kagan also serves as a member of secretary clinton's foreign policy board soon to be senator kerry's policy board and writes a monthly column on a world affairs from "the washington post" and the weekly standard and the new republic. joshua landis is the director of the center for middle east studies and this is the professor at the university of oklahoma. he writes a daily newsletter on syrian policy that attract some 200,000 pages a month. is really one of the most thoughtful blogs today on a which really dives into the crisis and syria. current the vice president for the new initiatives and the distinguished scholar at the woodrow wilson institute at national center for scholars in washington, d.c. they can have another great president. for nearly to nearly two decades has served the secretaries of state and advisers in the middle east bureau, negotiating middle east peace which w
by this president represents the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam. if it's carried out, i will resist it. in march 2008 you said, quote, here the term quagmire could apply. >> what are these, the fulbright hearings all over again? i lived through them. and this guy is going back into some "last year at marienbad" kind of weird 1970s movie where you go back into the past that never even happened. why is he fighting hagel over vietnam? >> well, it's interesting because he's ostensibly fighting with him over iraq, but it immediately becomes over vietnam. he seems to be mad that hagel took issue with him about iraq and compared it to vietnam being the big blunder, which, of course, mccain and hagel both served in. you know, when mccain talks about iraq, all he wants to talk about is from the surge on. it's as if everything before that didn't happen and didn't count, and we can still debate whether the surge worked or not, but the bigger issue is whether iraq was as bad as vietnam, and he doesn't want to have that argument. >> here is mccain sinking his teeth i
has made haiti one of the top foreign policy projects, helping the impoverished island build back better after the devastating earthquake that killed over a quarter million people. in no small measure has her husband -- president clinton -- been a part of that attempt at restoration of haiti from that devastating earthquake. last week during secretary clinton's final appearance before the senate foreign relations committee, she said -- and i quote -- "every time that blue and white airplane carrying the words "united states of america" touches down in some far-off capital, i feel again the honor it is to represent the world's indispensable nation. madam secretary, you have truly honored us with your indispensable leadership. and on behalf of all of our senate colleagues, we want to thank you for your extraordinary service to this country. and i want to say that your position will be in capable hands with our colleague and your former colleague, senator john kerry, who will serve as we confirm him in the next 24 hours as the 68th secretary of state. senator kerry has served in this
working relationship and american foreign policy. it was a public sign of solidarity between the two former rivals. yet that proved to be too much for the folks over at fox news. the "fox & friends" trio complained about the lack of real news, and attacked crawford for not digging deeper into clinton's health issues. >> the interview was awkward. they were giddy saying goodbye. and right at the top, steve kroft said they only gave us 30 minutes, which of course means there is not going to be any real news. and there wasn't. >> but if you give somebody 30 minutes, you could get real into it, especially steve kroft, who is usually awesome. but i think for some reason they didn't dig into anything at all. >> 30 minutes? come on. >> i would like to know, did she pass out and hit her head? was she pushed? how did she hit her head and get a concussion? >> and the whining didn't stop there. the network that served as the bush administration's head cheerleader is now taking issue with the questions asked of president obama and secretary clinton? >> i mean, didn't you expect one series of tou
that bigger question about putting and placing benghazi within the scope of a broader failure of foreign policy. and that's going to have to be what they're going to do if they're going to talk about chuck hagel. highlight the obama failure in this area and that chuck hagel is going to be a yes man for that strategy. if they're not able to do that in a hearing like this, they've been pressing for for months, it does not bowed wede for her-- >> and what about her state and benghazi now a negative concerns and arms control deal with russia, you were not enamored of, i recall. overall, what's her legacy? >> she's one of the most traveled secretary of state and diplomacy to her credit well. and sort of a famous figure who went to many countries. in terms of her influence on obama policy or much of any sort of achievements, it's impossible to me to point to anything and what's more remarkable about the hearings, that she sounded very hawkish and america must lead in north afri africa, we must halt the spreading-- >> you can't have a vacuum, but that's the policy that the administration has be
he is going to give his manifesto on what republican foreign policy should be. that's going to be next week on ronald reagan's birthday, rand paul. but, you know, it's fitting, because we're coming up on reagan's birthday. and did you hear about the horrible obama muslim marxist thing about his kenyan home? did you hear? >> this is one wall that probably shouldn't be torn down. this apartment building used to be the home of a young ronald reagan. it was denied landmark status, and the university of chicago is ready to demolish it. the university is also trying to become the site of president obama's presidential library. that's drawing strong concerns the university might turn president reagan's former house into a parking lot for an obama library. >> did you hear about that? chicago close ties with the obamas, all of them, tearing down ronald reagan's boyhood home in order to make a parking lot for barack obama's presidential library. did you hear? did you hear? see, here it is on drudge. reagan's home could become parking lot for obama library. here it is on something call
may approach foreign policy and national security in his second term. and in a little less than an hour and a half, a cato institute forum on the state of libertarianism. >> several live events to tell you about today. the georgetown university law center hosts a forum with campaign staff members and representatives of interest groups who will focus on how lessons of last year's campaign will affect legislation in the new congress. that's on c-span at 11 a.m. eastern. and here on c-span2 at 1 p.m., we're covering an atlantic council discussion on the situation in mali. >> john mccain's 2000 campaign when he ran for president is the most memorable campaign. i mean, of any that i've ever covered or been around. i mean, it was just -- we'll never, we'll never see it again. i mean, here he was, you know, facing george w. bush who had all the face cards of the republican party backing him, and the three republican governors in new hampshire and all the money, and john mccain went out and held 114 town meetings, and he stayed there until every or question was answered. and you'd see p
. was that a mistake? >> i don't think that was a mistake. if you look at the overarching ark of our foreign policy, democrats had a sizeable advantage over republicans on the issues of foreign policy and keeping us safe. hillary clinton played a large role in that. if you look at -- i agree with you on the arab spring. got only knows what that is going to turn into. if you look at getting rid of gadhafi, and a large role in whether or not she runs for president because americans don't pay that much attention to foreign policy. >> if she's healthy, given the blood cloth and concussion, if she's healthy, do you think there's any doubt that she's still thinking about being the first woman as president of the united states? >> i have no idea what is in her head. she's certainly a strong institution of the democratic party, certainly stronger than joe biden does. the foreign policy will loom large. we'll ask the question, so what did the obama administration's afghanistan surge accomplish exactly? they sent tens and thousands of additional troops, spent a lot of money. we are going to be out of afghani
a nominee tries to disavow his past positions on virtually every foreign policy issues all at the same time it raises serious questions. >> if hagel is confirmed by a strict party vote, how will it affect his relationship with republicans in congress? >> it sticks that he went from being a loyal republican to somebody who frankly took a differently point of view. he didn't endorse president obama, but he traveled with him and now prepared to be his secretary of defense. they kind of recent the fact that they think he is going to the other side. that said when he is in the pentagon and controls the military in that capacity, they will have to deal with him and have the same interest in common. both parties want to keep the u.s. strong and safe and chuck hagel has been through worse. believe me, he has seen much more incoming than at that hearing. >> republican strategist, good to see you. thank you. >> good to see you. >> still ahead on the saturday afternoon, the latest on the scandal around the top u.s. senator. first, on this date, an announcement that led to the moment so many had been c
described hagel as a "deeply embedded with a network of pro-iran foreign policy groups that have lobbied to lift economic sanctions and boost u.s. engagement with tehran." texas republican senator john cornyn offered a similar line of attack when he criticized the nomination on mon. >> i cannot support a nominee for defense secretary who thinks we should be tougher on israel and more lenient on iran. >> the group americans for a strong defense, didn't exist till this month. when it was set up apparently for the sole purpose of opposing chuck hagel. led by former rnc communications director danny diaz and romney visor brian hook the group is running is ads is urging democratic senators to vote no. >> barack obama's nominee for secretary of defense wants america to back down. an end to our nuclear program. devastating defense cuts, a weaker country. >> another group, american future fund has ads questioning hagel's ethics calling on the senate to post phone the hear. finally a group that purports to be coming from the left supported by members of the gay and lesbian community. the group ha
, the unrest taking place in egypt right now. clinton stood by one of the most consciousal foreign policy decisions the administration made that gets little little -- the ouster of mubarak. she responded to the head of the army who said that the state could fall part. >> that would lead to incredible chaos and violence on a scale that would be devastating for egypt and the region. >> clinton also commented on the russia reset. once perceived as a foreign policy success now has erode the to the point the russians won't even let american families adopt russian children. >> i think we just have to wait and see what the real objectives of the new russian leadership are. we thought it was self-defeating for them to take the actions they did, throwing out usaid. that hurts the russian people. i thought it was tragic that they stopped adoptions, especially those that were already in train. so there are issues. we will keep working on them, but we'll also draw lines where we disagree and seek out when we must. >> interesting she referred to it as they. we know when all this changed, when putin go
of foreign policy, but with an understanding of the nuanced approach necessary to effectively interact on a multinational scale. excuse me, stage. when vice president biden was chairman of the foreign relations committee, said on more than one occasion that good international relationships are always predicated on strong interpersonal relationships. john kerry understands that there is no substitute for strong interpersonal relationships, whether in the senate politics or international diplomacy. secretary of state is not a desk job and it requires constant personal interactions for american foreign policy. during his 30 years in public life and more than 25 years in the senate, senator kerry has championed many issues. earlier today the senate foreign relations committee favorably reported his nomination to the senate unanimously and presented senator kerry with an honorary resolution highlighting a few of his many accomplishments. among the accomplishments are the reforms with senator john mccain that led to an effort to investigate the fate of american soldiers unaccounted for in vi
the president in the countries foreign policy debates -- mr. kerry in the state department, mr. hagel at the pentagon, and mr. mccain, will all derive a substantial part of their legitimacy from vietnam experiences. mr. mccain's relationship with mr. kerr it isy the striking tale of the lingering influence of the vietnam. more than a decade later, mccain traveled to massachusetts to campaign against mr. kerry. yet the pair worked so closely in the cause of reviving relations with vietnam that they became friends. when mr. kerry appeared at a senate confirmation hearing last week, he was introduced by mr. mccain, who praised his ' exemplary statesmanship.' mr. mccain's relationship with mr. hagel what has gone the opposite way. 'i admire him and consider is friendship to be a treasure of inestimable value to me,' mr. mccain said in 2001. by the time mr. mccain became the presidential candidate and to designate, the relationship had cooled. mr. hagel refused to endorse 'm, telling 'the new yorker' we so fundamentally disagree on our future course of our foreign policy and our role in th
of the foreign-policy choices facing this country. and today we are continuing what we have come to call secretary of state week here in the council. on tuesday night we were fortunate to hear from george shultz, who served as secretary of state for some six and a half years under president ronald reagan. and this afternoon we are honored to host hillary rodham clinton. during her last 24 hours as president obama's first president obama's first secretary of state and immediately afterwards and told she might be expected to party like it's cartagena all over again. [laughter] we did a research and this is the eighth time that hillary clinton has spoken at the council and her third appearance in and her current incarnation as secretary of state. this afternoon speech is probably the most anticipated one she has given here and indeed it may be the most anticipated farewell address since 1796. [laughter] i suspect though that her views on untangling alliances might be somewhat different than george washington's. much has been made of the mile she has put in as the country's 67 secretary of s
-- and so you've had a lot to say about foreign policy. you've also had a thing or two to say about the republican position on taxes and a number of other issues. so i wonder, is your view that republicans need to get right on foreign policy and can that that is really a core issue that's affecting everything else, or do you see that fundamentally as a garnish on the salad, something maybe we ought to -- a nice to have, not an essential? >> you know, i think we need as a party to have -- i won't try to say his last name because i always butcher it myself -- i think we need john and bill need that wing of the party, but we also need realists that acted and thought and saw the world like we with did when we were in congress in the 1990s, when we controlled congress from '94 on where we believe inside a restrained foreign policy. .. as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from the fact he's a big government republican. he came in with $155 billion surplus. when you left we had a tr
there? i mean, vietnam has been sort of major thing, impacting american foreign policy for decades and obama administration first post-vietnam administration among democrats. not vietnam people and bringing it back in to the equation so what impact do you think vietnam will have on us going forward? >> i think if you look at his prepared statements, or the statements he delivered this morning, he said his view on the circumstances that should guide deploying troops to harm's way, to combat should be very, very specific and very, very carefully thought out. and i think that's a philosophy that's very much grounded in his experience as a combat veteran, as an enlisted soldier who saw combat and the reality of war. so i think, you know, i think from that perspective, that outlook is likely to shape how he conducts the afghan draw down, what advice to the white house about how quickly to pull troops and any future engagements across the world in places such as africa, elsewhere in the middle east, where you're seeing some troubles emerge and some calls for a greater u.s. intervention.
is very good in foreign policy and i think she will be -- i think this will help her in 2016. host: we go next to jeff in tupelo, mississippi. republican line. caller: good morning. how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: she got sworn in, she looked good in the pictures, she flew around the world a little bit, and nothing that she has accomplished. i don't think our allies are real pleased with. our enemies in the past belief in the best predictor of -- i mean, future behavior is past behavior. the only thing that the real bad people in this world understand is force. i don't think talking to them and making nice-nice with them is going to do anything except emboldened them. host: you made a statement about our allies and their perception? could you expand on that? caller: well, the lead from behind strategy of this administration got two diplomats killed and three brave americans killed in libya. as far as her taking responsibility for that, what responsibility is it that she has actually taken? none she actually said to the american people what difference does it make now for that
the democrats lost power in 1980, i became completely responsible on foreign policy, completely. when they were in power, they had to deal with the soviets. carter was weak, but when the soviets invaded afghanistan, he had the boycott, the olympic boycott. and he toughened up. one of the things he proposed was that the germans had wanted the americans to develop a neutron bomb. but instead, carter didn't want to do that. so he proposed to put in germany and in britain short range -- medium-range nuclear weapons as an answer to the soviets who had put medium weapons in eastern europe. that was a carter administration policy. reagan comes in in 1981 and democrats completely collapse. >> i was a speechwriter in 1980. i had nothing to do with him in 1984. but he and gary hart ran together to see who was the first to have been forced the nuclear freeze, which was the stupidest idea in the history of the nuclear age. i joined the new republican in 1981 on inauguration by the way. i wrote an editorial denouncing the freeze as an illusion and deception, which incidentally caused the most canceled subsc
we believed in a restrained foreign policy. so that's part of the balance. you know, you go back and you look at what william buckley said about iraq and he said it wasn't a conservative venture because there's nothing conservative about believing you're going to be able to change the way people live and think in other countries that don't have a democratic background. those were buckley's words, not mine. i think the bigger problem, though, really has to do on the domestic side of things because, you know, republicans i think as long as republicans have a coherent foreign policy, i think americans will go along with it. i think our bigger problem from the bush era came from he was a big government republican. he came in, we had $155 billion surplus. when he left we had $1 trillion deficit. our national debt doubled. we had a $7 trillion medicare drug benefit plan that polls showed was a 50/50 proposition at best. george w. bush didn't veto a single appropriations bill. and we saw not only -- because when you say this and start going down the list, some republicans get defensive.
country looks like in the foreign policy world for the next 25 years. maybe more than any other secretary of state and defense in a long time because clearly the president is ready to rethink our strategy, this leading from behind strategy has not been the strategy of the country for a generation. but it looks like that's where the president wants to go, and frankly, it looks like that's where senator hagel would want to join him. >> are you a definite no vote on chuck hagel? >> yeah, i think i am. i say i think i am because i haven't announced that until now. but i've thought about this a lot since yesterday. i want to give the president the benefit of the doubt in who he can bring to his cabinet with him and who can join him in the cabinet. but in this job, at this time, things like the -- senator hagel's comments on containment. i think he really does believe, based on his statements yesterday, even though he backed away from them later, that we could contain a nuclear iran. i don't think we could contain a nuclear iran. i think it's too dangerous for us to try that. and so i will be v
correct or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy plunder in th ee vietnam. correct or incorrect. the question is were you right or wrong? i would like an answer if you were right or wrong, and then you are free to elaborate? >> well, i'm not going to give you a -- a yes or no answer. >> name one person in your opinion who is intimidated by the israeli lobby in the united states senate? >> well, first -- >> name one. >> i don't know. >> well, why would you say it? >> i didn't have in mind a specific person. >> hmm. so, steve, how much was this politics and how much was this genuine, you know, policy concern? >> well, i think it was politics and policy and third, and i think it was personal. john mccain was the author of the surge of troops to iraq at the end of the administration, pushed it hard, took a lot of heat, including from the right. he takes it personal when chuck hagel calls it the bigst debacle since vietnam. and senator hagel dodging the question on whether he agreed with the same statement. hag mccain was getting testy and hagel was d
to the senate, i have been fortunate to be invited to his home for lengthy but fascinating foreign policy discussions with snoot colleagues on -- with senate colleagues and foreign policy experts. he was instrumental in securing passage of the new start treaty with russia. he served as an unofficial envoy to president obama to pakistan and some countries that probably none of us know where he went. there are many times he's come to me and said, i've got to go, and he tells me where he's going, thouing in the newspapers about -- nothing in the newspapers about where he'd gone. but he is a great evaluator of people, and because of that, the president trusts him and has sent him on all these missions. now he will do that as secretary of state. he's authored numerous pieces of legislation to prevent the global spread of h.i.v. aids. he also played a central role in crafting our policy in iraq and afghanistan in the war on traimpleterror. i can remember one time where he spent days and days with president karzai working 0en a difficult issue following the elections that they had there. he'he's
. as we all know, senator kerry has played a leading role in shaping american foreign policy for many years in his position on the foreign relations committee and as chair of that distinguished committee. as chair of that, he was instrumental in securing passage of the new start treaty, an arms control accord with russia that is helping to reduce the danger of nuclear proliferation. he has served as a trusted special envoy to afghanistan, sudan and pakistan at crucial moments. senator kerry advocated for democratic elections in the philippines. he was part of the delegation that uncovered the fraud that ultimately led to the removal of president ferdinand marcos. he was a strong proponent of u.s. action to end ethnic cleansing in kosovo and to impose sanctions on burma tied to human rights abuses. senator kerry has been a leader in promoting economic development and recovery in haiti, fighting global hiv-aids, supporting democracy and human dignity, and the advancement of human empowerment throughout the world. in his early days in the senate, senator kerry and i -- in fact, we were e
on israel yesterday. it is a huge foreign-policy issue for the. they happen to be in the middle of an environment that is unsettled and without clear paths forward. it is a core interest of the united states. again, it is a scenario where politicians feel strongly and american voters feel extremely strongly. there were some differences of opinion but got explored yesterday. again, that is part of the point of the hearing process -- of a confirmation progress -- process, getting into areas where people have concerns. host: one of the exchanges about israel, democrat from rhode island. >> interviews and speeches, i have always said i am a supporter of israel. in some cases, i have said a -- i am a strong supporter. i think it is in my book that we have a special relationship with israel. we always have. so i have never voted against israel ever in the 12 years i was in the senate. additional supplemental appropriations, the record is very clear. i might add, as long as we're on the subject, -- senator mel -- nelson may have a clear view of this, there have been a couple of recent
back. we've also contacted foreign policy experts. we'll have their reaction when i see you next. live in washington, kyla campbell, ktvu channel 2 news. >>> 7:14. the attack on the u.s. embassy in turkey comes on the same day that john kerry takes over as secretary of state. kerry will be sworn in at the state department this everyone why. before starting his new job, kerry made an emotional farewell tour across massachusetts. he said he wanted to thank the people he represented in the senate for 29 years. >>> hillary clinton will give her farewell speech to the state department this afternoon on her last day as secretary of state. this is new video of clinton leaving home this morning for her last day on the job. clinton has said she looks forward to sleeping in after today. in fer four years, clinton traveled nearly a million miles and visited 112 countries. >>> 7:15. well, it's a first in the nation and the city of oakland will introduce it today. it's both an i.d. card and a debit card designed to help low-income people as well as imgrants who often don't have access to bank accou
fighter jets to egypt. here is louie gohmert on "fox & friends." this administration's foreign policy. the foreign policy is, what difference does it make? hey, what difference does it make if we give our sworn enemies, people who want to wipe israel and us off the map, so we give them the method to wipe them out? what's the big deal? we're putting ourselves in jeopardy when we're sending jets and tanks to a man who a leader whose only two enemies he he said in the past are israel and the united states are resupplying our enemies with the means to fight us. the founder and president of the amaker islamic forum and philosophy. thanks for being on the show. >> thanks, clayton for having me. >> if you listen to the congressman. he makes it sound as if egypt is our sworn enemy right now. is that the case? and, if so, why are we sending them the numbers i see 16 f-16s and 200 abraham's tanks by the end of the year? >> >> it's pretty horrifying clayton that we are doing. this and goes beyond the weaponry this is about supporting ideology sworn against the united states, against the west, ag
of the topics include foreign policy, and control, and women's abortion rights. it begins at noon eastern with cdc's "meet the press." at 1:00 p.m., but the ranking member of the foreign relations committees, senator john mccain, of addendas -- bob menendez. at two o'clock p.m. it is "fox news sunday." and assistant majority leader -- the state of the union follows at 3:00 p.m.. also a retired general and former cia director. administered by dianne feinstein and gov. bob macdonald of virginia and gov. scott walker of wisconsin. at 4:00, bob schieffer talks with senator dianne feinstein. the sending network talk shows this afternoon on c-span radio are brought to you by a public service by the network and c- span. the re-air begins -- you can listen to them all on c- span radio. nationwide on at some satellite radio channel 119. you can listen to on your smart phone or go online to c- spanradio.org >> what is the best training for a policeman? >> the best training -- you learn how to develop sources, you learn how the use intelligence information, you learn how to leverage relationships. t
journal" in 2,000,008, amy has covered a variety of topics including foreign policy, national security letter clever to rising and the election of the new supreme court justice. prior to nj she was a staff writer for the reporters committee for freedom of the press. ireport from the automakers panel will include, and i would love you all to be able to hear these folks names as i introduce them. robert bienenfeld senior manager environment and energy strategy product regulatory office, american honda motor company incorporated. reg modlin director of regulatory affairs chrysler llc. tom stricker vice president predatory affairs in energy and environmental research, toyota motors north america incorporated and amy, if you would like to get started we will try to get the audience to quiet down. >> thank you for that great introduction. we have two out of three of our panelists so i guess that is the two-thirds majority so we will go ahead and get started. i think that was a great discussion with gina mccarthy and mary nichols and the other experts on that panel. i want to take the big pic
of the hard issues, those really traditional foreign policy international policy issues. some critics would say she didn't accomplish much of anything and she leaves john kerry a pretty fragile world. other people would say, no, she actually injected into the conversation, changed the conversation about international policy. what she talked about and what she followed through on were the issues of women's development, economic development, children, family and increasing the conversation as she would put it with people around the world, not just talking to governments, but beginning this two-way conversation with people all over the world. so that debate is going to go on for a long time. >> we're watching secretary of state hillary clinton say farewell to some of the 69,000 state department employees. john king and gloria borger are here in the studio with me. she has now a record high in the washington post/abc news poll. a 67% favorability rating and from december, democrats, 65% of democrates say they're likely to support hillary clinton if she seeks the democratic nomination for presid
or incorrect when you said that the surge would be the most dangerous foreign policy blunder in this country since vietnam? were you correct or incorrect? yes or no. >> my reference to the surge being the most dangerous -- >> senator hagel, the question is were you right or wrong? that's a pretty straightforward question. i would like the answer whether you are right or wrong and then you are free to elaborate. >> well, i'm not going to give you a yes or no. >> so it feels like the senator is still fighting the iraq war there. who do you think, alice, looks worse in the exchange between the two men? >> well, clearly hagel. he couldn't put up a good defense for his position in that particular area. this is one area where he just clearly didn't understand what his record was. he first was for the iraq war and then he was opposed to the iraq surge, saying it was a terrible blunder on the part of the u.s. when in fact it worked. he also had trouble answering questions about where he stands with israel. he has failed repeatedly in the past senator to show solidarity with our greatest friend and a
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 59 (some duplicates have been removed)